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09.07.2012, 14:42 quote

majeek

apach3 wrote:
You seemed to imply your definition was the full one; as far as i know, even on the briggs site doesnt give you the full definition and i was incorrect in saying that briggs is the horses mouth lol

The below might shed some light on the matter:

Quote:
Extraversion is "the act, state, or habit of being predominantly concerned with and obtaining gratification from what is outside the self". Extraverts tend to enjoy human interactions and to be enthusiastic, talkative, assertive, and gregarious. They take pleasure in activities that involve large social gatherings, such as parties, community activities, public demonstrations, and business or political groups. Politics, teaching, sales, managing and brokering are fields that favor extraversion. An extroverted person is likely to enjoy time spent with people and find less reward in time spent alone. They tend to be energized when around other people, and they are more prone to boredom when they are by themselves.


Quote:
IntroversionIntroversion is "the state of or tendency toward being wholly or predominantly concerned with and interested in one's own mental life". Some popular writers have characterized introverts as people whose energy tends to expand through reflection and dwindle during interaction. This is similar to Jung's view, although he focused on psychic energy rather than physical energy. Few modern conceptions make this distinction.

The common modern perception is that introverts tend to be more reserved and less outspoken in groups. They often take pleasure in solitary activities such as reading, writing, using computers, hiking and fishing. The archetypal artist, writer, sculptor, engineer, composer, and inventor are all highly introverted. An introvert is likely to enjoy time spent alone and find less reward in time spent with large groups of people, though he or she may enjoy interactions with close friends. Trust is usually an issue of significance: a virtue of utmost importance to an introvert choosing a worthy companion. They prefer to concentrate on a single activity at a time and like to observe situations before they participate, especially observed in developing children and adolescents. They are more analytical before speaking. Introverts are easily overwhelmed by too much stimulation from social gatherings and engagement, introversion having even been defined by some in terms of a preference for a quiet, more minimally stimulating environment.

Introversion is not seen as being identical to shy or to being a social outcast. Introverts prefer solitary activities over social ones, whereas shy people (who may be extroverts at heart) avoid social encounters out of fear, and the social outcast has little choice in the matter of his or her solitude.


"Experts" love to generalise and as such, should be taken with a pinch of salt. like anything in life, there are no real hard and fast rules. Each person is an individual, each may have their own reasons for what they do.

Think about maybe an only child who has been brought up with only adults around and therefore socially excluded from gatherings due to age. That social exclusion soon becomes the "norm", since they don't know any different, they don't go out of their way to mix with others. Not because they can't, but because it's just not "normal" to do so. It often requires an effort on the part of others to include them and some can be the life and soul of the party once accepted into a group, you soon find out how extrovert they really are.

Those who are quick to judge others are often the ones missing out the most.

 

12.07.2012, 12:16 quote

majeek

apach3 wrote:
Clearly there are always going to be more variables to consider, we're complex beings after all, but your example seems to be a generalisation too Razz

Each person has their own way of coping with their situation. My description was meant as an example of how it could deviate from the Experts ideal rather than describing another generalised group.

 
 
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